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Effect of exhaled moisture on breathing resistance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators.

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Title

Effect of exhaled moisture on breathing resistance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators.

Subject

Description

This study evaluated the effect of exhaled moisture on the breathing resistance of three classes of filtering facepiece respirators (FFR) following 4 h of continuous wear at a breathing volume of 40 l min(-1), utilizing an automated breathing and metabolic simulator as a human surrogate.

Date

2010-08

Citation

Roberge, Raymond J., Emily Bayer, Jeffrey B. Powell, Aitor Coca, Marc R. Roberge, and Stacey M. Benson. 2010. "Effect of Exhaled Moisture on Breathing Resistance of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators." The Annals of Occupational Hygiene 54 (6):671-7.

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of exhaled moisture on the breathing resistance of three classes of filtering facepiece respirators (FFR) following 4 h of continuous wear at a breathing volume of 40 l min(-1), utilizing an automated breathing and metabolic simulator as a human surrogate. After 4 h, inhalation and exhalation resistance increased by 0.43 and 0.23 mm of H(2)O pressure, respectively, and average moisture retention in the respirators was 0.26 ml. Under ambient conditions similar to those of the current study, and at similar breathing volumes, it is unlikely that exhaled moisture will add significantly to the breathing resistance of filtering facepiece respirators (FFR) over 4 h of use.

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Free online Open Access

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