Ebola: characterization, history and cutaneous manifestations/ Ébola: caracterización, historia y manifestaciones cutáneas; lo que debemos saber

Item Type:

Publication

Title

Ebola: characterization, history and cutaneous manifestations/ Ébola: caracterización, historia y manifestaciones cutáneas; lo que debemos saber

Description

Ebola virus (EV) is one of the most virulent human pathogens. Fruits bats are its natural reservoir, the transmission to humans is across wild animals (especially primates) and the propagation in human populations is through bodily fluid contact.

Date Last Updated (Year-Month-Day)

2015-11-01

Citation

M. Kolbach, J. E. Carrasco-Zuber, and V. Vial-Letelier. "[Ebola: Characterization, History and Cutaneous Manifestations]." Rev Med Chil 143, no. 11 (Nov 2015): 1444-8.

Abstract

Ebola virus (EV) is one of the most virulent human pathogens. Fruits bats are its natural reservoir, the transmission to humans is across wild animals (especially primates) and the propagation in human populations is through bodily fluid contact. The actual outbreak started in December 2013 and crossed continental borders. Up to now, there are 17,145 suspected and confirmed cases with 6,070 deaths, resulting a total case fatality rate of 35%. Clinical manifestations can be divided in 3 phases. In phase I, symptoms are similar to flu, which may appear in a range of 2 to 21 days. In phase II which occurs in over 50% of cases, visceral symptoms and mucocutaneous manifestations appear within 4 and 5 days of the onset of symptoms. The main symptoms are a macular or maculopapular non-pruritic rash, desquamation and mucosal involvement of eyes, mouth and pharynx. In phase III, recovery or death occurs. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, epidemiological suspicion and a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The treatment is supportive. If there is a suspected case, it should be notified immediately and all relevant safety measures should be instituted.

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Free online, CC-BY

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