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Monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in a general pediatric ward in Singapore

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Title

Monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in a general pediatric ward in Singapore

Subject

Description

There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that transmission of respiratory viruses occurs through the inhalation of virus-laden particles.

Date

2019-12-04

Citation

Yadana, Su, Kristen Kelli Coleman, Tham Thi Nguyen, Christophe Hansen-Estruch, Shirin Kalimuddin, Koh Cheng Thoon, Jenny Guek Hong Low, and Gregory Charles Gray. 2019. "Monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in a general pediatric ward in Singapore." J Public Health Res 8 (3):1407-.

Abstract

Abstract

There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that transmission of respiratory viruses occurs through the inhalation of virus-laden particles. Our study describes the use of an aerosol sampling system to monitor the prevalence of airborne viruses in a hospital setting. Using SKC AirCheck Touch pumps, with National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) bioaerosol samplers and SKC filter cassette blanks, 28 aerosol samples were collected in a hospital ward in Singapore. Following DNA/RNA extraction, real-time RT-PCR/PCR was used for the detection of influenza A, B and D viruses, coronaviruses, enteroviruses, and adenoviruses. Airborne virus was detected in nine (32%) of 28 samples. Among the nine positive samples, eight were PCR-positive for adenovirus and one for influenza A virus. Our data suggest that bioaerosol sampling could be valuable in monitoring for airborne respiratory viruses in clinical environments to better understand the risk of infection during a hospital visit.

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CC-BY-NC This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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