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Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States

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Title

Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States

Description

Many of the survivors of the 2014–2015 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa were women of childbearing age.

Publisher

CDC

Date

2016-07

Citation

Kamali, Amanda, Denise J. Jamieson, Julius Kpaduwa, Sarah Schrier, Moon Kim, Nicole M. Green, Ute Ströher, Atis Muehlenbachs, Michael Bell, Pierre E. Rollin, and Laurene Mascola. 2016. "Pregnancy, Labor, and Delivery after Ebola Virus Disease and Implications for Infection Control in Obstetric Services, United States." Emerging infectious diseases 22 (7):1156-61.

Abstract

Many of the survivors of the 2014–2015 epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa were women of childbearing age. Limited clinical and laboratory data exist that describe these women’s pregnancies and outcomes. We report the case of an EVD survivor who became pregnant and delivered her child in the United States, and we discuss implications of this case for infection control practices in obstetric services. Hospitals in the United States must be prepared to care for EVD survivors.

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